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When interviewing, a candidate answers a series of questions you design to get to know them better. Some questions look at personality, intelligence and their ability to be a team player, but what about those traits you didn’t consider? How do you measure and understand the unspoken traits?

Alive and Kicking: When interviewing a candidate, look for someone who is aware of their surroundings and seems more engaged and “awake.” An interview should be invigorating and exciting. If a candidate looks like they were unprepared or “going through the motions” why would you want to have them on your team?

 

Own It: A candidate should own their story from beginning to end. Their career path should be one they are passionate about sharing and inviting you to go on a ride with them. Stories that show a career happening to them instead of them creating the path shows a passive nature.

 

Opinions: Look for someone with opinions about things without forcing them onto you. Delve into their answers to questions and determine if they are simply saying what you want to hear or if they are believing their own answers, too.

 

Correlations: A candidate that can look at their past and draw conclusions about how they can apply that knowledge into your company and the future is someone that you want working at your company. They are a problem-solver and someone willing to think critically about situations.

 

Laughing and Smiling: Look for a candidate that can relate and make you smile throughout the interview. Some people come across too serious, which may work in their position, however think about this in terms of who they will be dealing with on a daily basis. If someone cannot relate quickly with you during an interview, a job requiring positive interaction may not be the right fit for them.

 

Confidence: Someone who is confident, not cocky, in their abilities will be an asset to any team. Healthy conflict is important to coming to the right decisions and confidence plays a key role in their ability to communicate.

 

Personal Time: A candidate who values their own personal time and has a life outside of work means they are balanced and well rounded. They know their own limits and needs and will maintain them appropriately without becoming burned out too quickly.

 

Understanding and Drive: Hiring someone who has an understanding of what they want out of their job and position means you will find someone that knows how they can produce for your company because it is fulfilling to them as well.

 

Motivation: A self-motivated person wants more than just a paycheck each month. They are the ones that are constantly thinking about how to improve their job, division, work efficiency and the company as a whole. They are not afraid to press boundaries and try new things to continue improving.

 

Personal Responsibility: Lastly, try to find a candidate that doesn’t blame everyone else for their shortcomings. This should be easy to spot in an interview when you ask why they left their last job. Pay attention to how they talk about their last position and whether they take ownership for anything.

 

Want to hire someone who fits all these qualities? Interview a few River City Staffing candidates today!

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